EC Fan-Addict Club

Fasten your drool cups under your dribbling chins, you poor furshlugginer kids! Welcome to the EC FAN-ADDICT CLUB on Facebook! A club that is as much about the FANS as the comics! Share your memories and your collections - EC art and artists and anything of interest to the modern GhouLunatic. Brought to you by Skizziks and Heap (the lifelong EC collecting blood brothers), all Ghouloots are invited! Heh heh heh...
Tim Johnson
Tim JohnsonSunday, June 25th, 2017 at 8:01am
What is the current value of this set? Or, how much would YOU be willing to pay for this set? I don't have one, but how much is too much to pay? Thanks in advance.
Thommy Burns
Thommy BurnsSunday, June 25th, 2017 at 7:48am
GRAHAM INGELS ART FOR "EXPOSE": When Lyle Stuart was hired as business manager for EC, he moved the office for his own publication, "Expose", to 225 Lafayette St. He also apparently used certain EC artists for illustrations, as this Ingels piece shows (note address on the back of the art). This piece is almost more terrifying than anything in Haunt Of Fear, due to the true historical subject matter.
George Thompson
George ThompsonSaturday, June 24th, 2017 at 11:35am
Nice having a used book shop on the way to the grocery store. Everyday can indeed be a holiday...like Christmas in June for a measley $4!!!
Jon Gothold
Jon GotholdSunday, June 25th, 2017 at 2:48am
TWO-FISTED MONTH-DAY TWENTY-FOUR!

Issue #41 of Two-Fisted Tales is the last issue.

For me, Two-Fisted Tales #41 was the first issue.

In 1972, I completed my Mad run, and I was actively pursuing the other EC titles. By that time, I was a die-hard Fan Addict, and I told my fellow EC Fan Addict buddy Bart that I planned to collect every EC, and it would probably take me my whole life to do it. I was 16 at the time; I figured my odds were pretty good I could do it.

I knew about the horror comics and the sci-fi comics from the Ballantine paperbacks, so I had a few of those by the time I told comic dealer Terry Stroud that I wanted to try out some of the other EC titles. I knew I wanted a Piracy, I had seen so many ads for it in Mad and it looked great. Terry said “Well geeze, you’re such a Kurtzman nut, why don’t you try his war comics?” and he hands me Frontline Combat #8 and this copy of Two-Fisted Tales #41.

Kurtzman did war comics?!? Whaaaaattttt????? I don’t think he ever mentioned them in the old Mad comics, so I had no idea. I love a good war comic anyway, so I was over the moon as I flipped thru these and saw that all my Mad heroes-Wood, Davis, Severin, and Elder were in these comics too. I couldn’t buy them fast enough, and I couldn’t wait to get home and read them.

I know now that the last two Issues of Two-Fisted Tales were sort of ambivalently assembled, and that Kurtzman didn’t have anywhere near the involvement with them as he had earlier. And now I know that Kurtzman didn’t write any of the stories in #41-Severin and Evans each wrote their own, Jerry DeFuccio wrote “Carl Ackley!” and nobody seems to know who wrote “Mau-Mau!”.

But my 16-year-old self looked at that Jack Davis cover and thought it was the most beautiful Jack Davis drawing I had ever seen. And inside, what a great variety of adventure stories there were. Wood drew a stunning jungle story in titled “Carl Ackley!” that was not only a great story, but also true. John Severin has a nice period piece about pistol duels, and there were two artists that were new to me at that time-George Evans, who I immediately fell in love with and his WW I air combat tale, “Yellow!”, and a guy named B. Krigstein drawing the cover story “Mau Mau!”. I loved the story, it was another jungle adventure with even more action than “Carl Ackley!”, but I wasn’t too sure about Krigstein. That opinion would change very soon after I saw more of his EC work, but this story looked kinda cruddy to me compared to everyone else.

This issue also started out with a full-page announcement that it was the last issue. I was disappointed by that news, but I figured there were 40 other issues of Two-Fisted Tales to collect, so that wasn’t too bad, at least there were a lot of them to find. Little did I know.

On the day I got this, I thought Frontline Combat was a war comic, and Two-Fisted Tales was an adventure book. I had no idea that during its 24-issue life, Two-Fisted Tales would be an adventure comic, then a war comic, then a character driven comic, and finally an adventure comic again. All I knew was that I loved it, and I was going to get them all as soon as I could.

Kurtzman’s two war comics were then next EC runs I completed after Mad, and they hold a very special place in my heart. They are not only the finest war comics ever done, but in my opinion, some of the very finest comics that were ever done, period.
Ian Scott McGregor
Ian Scott McGregorSunday, June 25th, 2017 at 7:51am
What -- me, $203,150.00?
James Thompson
James ThompsonSunday, June 25th, 2017 at 7:51am
As many of us know, Castle Of Frankenstein magazine was done by EC fans who also knew many of the artists. Bhob Stewart was very important to CoF for a long while, and likely provided this Wood plug.
Daniel Ripoll
Daniel RipollSunday, June 25th, 2017 at 5:16am
Random question just for fun: You can pick any known GFC. Which one would you pick? Do you go with rarer but lower conditioned issues, do you max out on a 9.8 of your fave or do you go for the all time classics like CSS 22 or WSF 29?
Dion Draper
Dion DraperSunday, June 25th, 2017 at 3:47am
Alan Hutchinson
Alan HutchinsonSaturday, June 24th, 2017 at 4:58pm
WHAT IS THIS?
Anthony Andrews
Anthony AndrewsWednesday, June 21st, 2017 at 12:36am
Two-Fisted Month Day 20 !! Issue #37 or what I like to call Severin's kick ass 2 fisted tales. Well after Philip Smith's intro yesterday, there isn't really much to say other than this truly is Severin's book now , gone is any flavour Kurtzman attached to it other than the title. Personally I felt the Dawkins-Severin team-up was perfect and the issues they did together were fluid and if this book had been produced this way a few years earlier more towards the height of Western comic popularity , this book with this format would have been a juggernaut .For me Severin was a art genius and had a way of bringing western stories to life like no other artist of his time could. Anyways enough of my Severin praise instead I am going to give you oodles of comic goodness to look at and show you the silverprints page by page for this issue instead. I thought I owned them all for this issue but am missing Showdown. The thing I enjoy the most about these silverprints is you can see and feel the time Marie took in colouring her brothers work . Okay gents get slinging your 37's up here today .
Philip Smith
Philip SmithSaturday, June 24th, 2017 at 2:37am
TWO-FISTED MONTH—DAY 23! With this, the penultimate issue of the title, the Dawkins/Severin concept was junked, and the book reverted to a variety of artists (who mostly wrote their own stories). This issue was released in September 1954, the month that the New Trend was officially scrapped by Gaines.

The cover by George Evans (his only such for the series) gives a foretaste of the WWI aviation theme he would focus on in ACES HIGH, and this is also the subject of his self-written story within, “Flaming Coffins!”

The lead story, “Dien Bien Phu!”, was drawn by Severin and written by John Putnam, who came on staff around this time to work on MAD (he is credited with “Production” in MAD #24, the first magazine issue). This is Putnam’s only E.C. script, and it addresses the French military fiasco from the spring of 1954 that laid the groundwork for the eventual Vietnam War. (Putnam was, incidentally, good friends with photographer Diane Arbus, and a major contributor to Paul Krassner’s THE REALIST, for which he designed the logo and mascot.)

Severin himself wrote his other story in the issue, “Sharpshooter!” (a Civil War story), and Jack Davis adapted “The Last of the Mohicans!” by James Fenimore Cooper to round out the issue.

Harvey Kurtzman recalled having some editorial oversight of the last two issues of the title, though his felt presence is minimal here, aside from a reader letter expressing a hope that the Civil War series will continue. While this and the final issue have their moments, it is clear that this grab-bag approach from individual contributors lacks the punch and vision of the book at its peak.

Anecdotally speaking, the last two issues definitely seem somewhat scarcer than the earlier ones, with the last issue being in noticeably shorter supply on the secondhand market. At least that has been my experience! I paid $22.85 for this VG+ copy in 2015.
Philip Smith
Philip SmithFriday, June 23rd, 2017 at 3:52am
TWO-FISTED MONTH—DAY 22! TWO-FISTED TALES 39, released in July 1954, is the last of the Severin/Dawkins issues. At this point an extended storyline had been introduced for featured character Ruby Ed Coffey, so the first story, “Uranium Valley!” (which provides the cover scene), is a continuation of “Lost City!” the opener from the previous issue. This has something of the effect of a movie serial, and it is unfortunate that the experiment was not given more time to play out. (There are also stories featuring recurring characters Cheyenne Hawk and Black Jack Slaughter.)

It’s not clear why exactly this approach was scrapped (while presumably it didn’t sell hugely, secondhand copies are by no means scarce, and it does seem more deliberate, distinctive, and promising than the pure grab-bag approach of the last two issues). Or, for that matter, why some sort of TWO-FISTED TALES package was not continued into the New Direction era, since it would have certainly fared better than M.D. or PSYCHOANALYSIS under any paradigm, and PANIC and the combined S.F. titles were allowed to continue, at least for a while.

The third story here, “The Secret!”, has uncredited pencils by Gene Colan (who had previously appeared in issue #30).

It does appear that Kurtzman regained some sort of oversight for the last two issues, though quoted memories are dim, so possibly it was a matter of no obvious advocate for the book once he was fully occupied with MAD.

After this issue, Dawkins only wrote two more stories for E.C. (both for Severin appearances in EXTRA!, which was the only New Direction title to which the artist contributed). As TWO-FISTED TALES concluded its run, Severin had two stories in issue #40 and one in issue #41, and he (Severin) took up a staff art position at Atlas soon after (working, for instance, on early MAD magazine copy SNAFU in 1955). This reportedly prevented him from returning to MAD once Feldstein had taken the reins, though he was soon to become the driving visual force behind CRACKED.
Brian Olson
Brian OlsonSunday, June 25th, 2017 at 1:58am
EC Annual Sale!
$9 each plus shipping!
Printed by Russ Cochran in full color; 4 or 5 full issues per annual.
Weird Science 3, 4, 5
Crime SuspensStories 1
Haunt of Fear 2
Tales from the Crypt 4
No tears or markings, no musty odor!
Let me know if you need photos!
Chet Jasper Reams
Chet Jasper ReamsSunday, August 21st, 2016 at 5:57am
Seeing Sonny Brucato's thread brings to mind another good question; That is, which living artists (and writers) would fit in (or would you put in) the new EC CRYPT series from Super Genius?

My choices: Steve Stiles, Richard Corben, T. Casey Brennan, just to name a FEW.
Frank Motler
Frank MotlerFriday, June 23rd, 2017 at 9:48pm
TWO-FISTED MONTH, JOHN SEVERIN: follow-on from Philip Smith​'s recent mail, which commented on John Severin working at Atlas/Goodman following his period at EC; here's an extensive listing of covers he drew there, 1955 to 1959, which shows how much his skills were appreciated. Around 180 covers, all told...

Info culled from the excellent Atlastales website, which specialises in the comics of publisher Martin Goodman (1939 - 1961).

I've attached a few samples fyi. Also included is the unpublished original art for Tales of Justice (sold $2,930 via Heritage, 2013)

Atlas Tales, John Severin covers (link below):
-----------------------------------------------------------
Type Information Issue Cover Date Credits
cover Battle 36 January 1955 John Severin pencils signed
cover Brute Strength
The Man Who Quit! Tales of Justice 57 December 1955 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Last of the Tomahawks! Apache Kid 17 December 1955 John Severin pencils signed
cover Gun Savvy!
Rustlers' Round-up! Kid Colt Outlaw 55 December 1955 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Plunderers!
Siege! Gunsmoke Western 32 December 1955 Joe Maneely pencils and inks unsigned
John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Wyatt Earp 2 January 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Lady Who Vanished!
The Man Who Couldn't Breathe! Journey Into Mystery 30 January 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Shotgun Guard! Cowboy Action 10 January 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover What Lurks Beneath? Astonishing 46 February 1956 John Severin pencils signed
cover The Last Attack!
The Jungle War! Combat Casey 26 February 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Marines in Action 5 February 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Eyes!
Old John's Secret!
The House That Wasn't Strange Stories of Suspense 7 February 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover B'wana Martin!
The Tyrant Tales of Justice 58 February 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Desperate Hour! Ringo Kid 10 February 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Hit and Run! Battlefront 39 March 1956 John Severin pencils signed
cover Thieves in the Night! Billy Buckskin 3 March 1956 John Severin pencils signed
cover Six-gun Challenge! Kid Colt Outlaw 58 March 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Stand Up and Fight! The Outlaw Kid 10 March 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Black Fang's Revenge!
The Last Survivor!
Perilous Journey! Wild Western 48 March 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Combat Kelly 36 April 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Marines in Battle 11 April 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Man From the Panhandle! Ringo Kid 11 April 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Man Who Came Back! Apache Kid 19 April 1956 John Severin pencils signed
cover Badman's Bluff!
Billy Buckskin Rides Again! Gunsmoke Western 34 April 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover King of the Badlands! Kid Colt Outlaw 59 April 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Riot 5 April 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Under Fire! Battlefront 40 May 1956 John Severin pencils signed
cover The Hidden Raiders!
We Attack At Dawn! War Comics 41 May 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Behold the Sorcerer!
The Secret of the Mountain Top!
When Will They Come? World of Fantasy 1 May 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Bull Larson Strikes! Quick-Trigger Western 12 May 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Desperado! Rawhide Kid 8 May 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Verdict Tales of Justice 60 June 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Bandits of Buena Vista! Annie Oakley 11 June 1956 John Severin pencils signed
cover Priority Target!
Caught by the Commies! Marines in Battle 12 June 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Gun-Fighter! Two-Gun Kid 31 June 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Gunsmoke Western 35 June 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Life and Death of Spade Newman! Western Gunfighters 20 June 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Devil-Dog Dugan 1 July 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Break-thru! Marines in Action 7 July 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Outlaw's Hideout!
The Man from Cheyenne! Quick-Trigger Western 13 July 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Wichita War!
Mystery Of The Stagecoach Stick-Ups! Wyatt Earp 5 July 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Sgt. Brady Blasts the Reds! War Comics 42 July 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Outlaws' Ambush!
Pecos Justice! Rawhide Kid 9 July 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Convicts! Caught 1 August 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Crash Landing!
Comabt In Commie-Land!
Send In The Infantry! Combat Kelly 38 August 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Sergeant Barney Barker 1 August 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Trap!
Ruthless!
Too Hot To Handle! Tales of Justice 61 August 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Bullets in Tombstone!
The Outlaw Breed! Western Kid 11 August 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Rustlers' Moon! Kid Colt Outlaw 63 August 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Frontier Western 4 August 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Man In The Cellar! Spellbound 29 August 1956 John Severin inks signed
Joe Maneely pencils and inks unsigned
cover Situation Hopeless! Battlefront 42 September 1956 John Severin pencils attributed
cover Devil-Dog Dugan 2 September 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Make One False Move! Marines in Action 8 September 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Sailor Sweeney 13 September 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Showdown In Shadow Gap! Rawhide Kid 10 September 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Man In The Shadows!
Downfall!
The Pay-Off! Caught 2 October 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Red Stronghold! Marines in Battle 14 October 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Sergeant Barney Barker 2 October 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover In the Rain!
Man In Hiding! Tales of Justice 62 October 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover When the Wild Bunch Rides!
The Man Called Dango! Western Outlaws 17 October 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Gun-Thunder! Rawhide Kid 11 November 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Bazooka Battle!
Comabt Zone!
The Enemy! Battle 49 November 1956 John Severin pencils attributed
cover Sailor Sweeney 14 November 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Saga of the Fargo Kid! Two-Gun Western 7 November 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Mysterious Bandit Wyatt Earp 7 November 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Mob! Wild Western 52 November 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Missing in Action! Battlefront 43 November 1956 John Severin pencils attributed
cover Beyond the Law! Kid Colt Outlaw 66 November 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Hostages!
The Raiders Attack! Battle Action 26 December 1956 John Severin pencils attributed
cover The Trap!
The Man Who Couldn't Stop! Caught 3 December 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Sergeant Barney Barker 3 December 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Punishment! Tales of Justice 63 December 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover The Trap Yellow Claw 2 December 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Raids the Reds! Marines in Battle 15 December 1956 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Ambush!
The Man From Owlhoot City! Frontier Western 6 December 1956 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Reds All Around Us! Battle 50 January 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover The Enemy!
In the Commie Camp! Battlefront 44 January 1957 John Severin pencils attributed
cover One Step from Death! Battleground 15 January 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover The Mystery Of The Black Box!
I Live In Fear! Marvel Tales 154 January 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Torpedoed!
Bombs Away!
Shakedown Cruise! Navy Action (2nd - Jan 57) 15 January 1957 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover My Patrol is Doomed! War Comics 45 January 1957 Joe Maneely inks unsigned
John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
Joe Maneely pencils and inks unsigned
cover Draw ... If Yuh Dare!
The Man From Natchez! Western Outlaws 18 January 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Fastest Draw in Texas!
Kid Yukon, Gunslinger! Six-Gun Western 1 January 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover No More Ammo!
Captured By The Enemy! Combat Casey 31 January 1957 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Man Missing!
Ruthless!
Man on the Run!
The Payoff! Caught 4 February 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Combat Kelly 41 February 1957 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover G.I. Tales 4 February 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover While the City Slumbers Mystic 56 February 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Outlaws' Escape! Quick-Trigger Western 16 February 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Tales of the Marines 4 February 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover His Back to the Wall! Western Gunfighters 24 February 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover In the Dead of Night! Tales of Justice 64 February 1957 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover No Place to Turn! Gunsmoke Western 39 February 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Condemned! Rawhide Kid 13 March 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Kid Colt Outlaw 70 March 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Col. Chang's Last Stand!
The Face of the Enemy!
The Raiders Strike! Battlefront 45 March 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover Battleground 16 March 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover Somewhere in North Korea!
Weapons...Useless! Combat Casey 32 March 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Object: Liberation! Marines in Action 11 March 1957 John Severin pencils attributed
cover Ghost Town!
Come and Get Us, Marshal! Wyatt Earp 9 March 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Kid Slade, Gunfighter 6 March 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Commie Busters
Battlefield Fury! Battle Action 28 April 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover The Man Who Was Framed!
The Wages of Crime!
The Spider Strikes! Caught 5 April 1957 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Mass Attack!
Our Outfit Is Pinned Down
Prisoner Patrol Combat Kelly 42 April 1957 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Showdown Street! Gunsmoke Western 40 April 1957 Joe Maneely pencils signed
John Severin inks attributed
cover The Wrong Choice!
Your Life for Mine! Journey Into Unknown Worlds 56 April 1957 John Severin pencils unsigned
Carl Burgos inks guess
cover Somewhere The Sniper Waits! Marines at War 5 April 1957 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Surrender Or Else! Marines in Battle 17 April 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Mystery of the Silent Fog!
The Fish Men!
Midnight on the Moor! Mystery Tales 52 April 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Gun-Fighter For Hire!
Captive Town Quick-Trigger Western 17 April 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Thief!
The Strong and The Savage! Tales of Justice 65 April 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Gunfight at the O.K. Corral! Wyatt Earp 10 April 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Living Shadows Yellow Claw 4 April 1957 Jack Kirby pencils attributed
John Severin inks unsigned
cover My Gun Is Fastest!
Shoot-Out at Noon! Frontier Western 8 April 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Calculated Risk!
Able Company is Doomed! Battle 52 May 1957 John Severin pencils attributed
cover The Red Guerrillas Strike!
The Last Patrol! Battleground 17 May 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover The Reds Strike at Night!
Sneak Attack!
Under Fire! Combat Casey 33 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Draw on Sight! Kid Colt Outlaw 72 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Menace of the Submarine that Stalked! Navy Tales 3 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Sheriff of Tombstone! Two-Gun Western 10 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover An Ambush For Fox Company! War Comics 47 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Vegas Gang's Last Ride! Wyatt Earp 11 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Gunning For Trouble!
Showdown at Sunup! The Outlaw Kid 17 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Wild Bunch Strikes! Western Outlaws 20 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Outlaw's Ambush!
Here Comes Ringo! Western Trails 1 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Bounty Hunter! Wild Western 55 May 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Prisoners of the Reds! Battle Action 29 June 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover Seek, Find and Destroy! Commando Adventures 1 June 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Day of the Gun Duel! Gunsmoke Western 41 June 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Doomed Platoon!
Zeroed In By Red Artillery! Marines in Battle 18 June 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Nothing Can Save Us! Mystic 60 June 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Menace Of The Unseen Man! Strange Tales of the Unusual 10 June 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Guns of Dan Hawk! The Kid from Texas 1 June 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Smoky Showdown!
The Reign of Terror! Two-Gun Kid 37 June 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Outlaw's Guns!
Last Stage to Sundown! Western Kid 16 June 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Torpedoed!
The Hand That Held The Dagger! Navy Tales 4 July 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Get Kid Slade! Kid Slade, Gunfighter 8 July 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Mr. Mason's Strange Problem! Adventure Into Mystery 8 July 1957 John Severin pencils attributed
cover Trap In Commie Korea!
Ambush on Hill 888!
Major Mung's Secret! Combat Casey 34 July 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Last Warning!
Vow of Vengeance! Rawhide Kid 15 July 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover When the Claytons Took Tombstone! Six-Gun Western 4 July 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Man Who Tamed a Town!
Day of Danger! Western Trails 2 July 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Commies and Sgt. Swayer! War Comics 48 July 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Bet with Death!
Showdown at Horseshoe Flats! Kid Colt Outlaw 74 July 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Kid Straps on His Guns!
The Reno Gang Rides!
The Coward! The Kid from Dodge City 1 July 1957 Don Heck pencils and inks unsigned
John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Hit 'Em and Hit 'Em Hard! Commando Adventures 2 August 1957 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Roaring .45's! Two-Gun Kid 38 August 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Outlawed!
Men Without Faces!
The Mystery Of Morro Mesa! Wyatt Earp 13 August 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Raiders of Powder River!
The Last Hours of Hank Borden! Western Gunfighters 27 August 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Cooley Gang Strikes!
Empty Holsters!
The Life And Death of the Phoenix Kid! Frontier Western 10 August 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover I Dare Yuh to Draw! Gunsmoke Western 42 August 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover Owlhoot's Trail! Western Kid 17 August 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover One-Man Mission! The Reds Were Waiting for Us! Battleground 20 September 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover Marines in Action 14 September 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Treachery at Hangman's Bridge! The Black Rider Rides Again! 1 September 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Revenge!
The Posse Rides By Night!
His Guns Treed Tombstone! Quick-Trigger Western 19 September 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Treachery in Caliber City! The Outlaw Kid 19 September 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Dippy Duck 1 October 1957 John Severin pencils attributed
cover Trail to Tombstone!
Ambush At Red River!
Bandit! Gunsmoke Western 43 November 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Action on Hill 202! Battle 55 December 1957 John Severin pencils signed
cover The Fastest Gun? Two-Gun Kid 39 December 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover What was Mightier Than a Six-Gun?
The Marshal is a Phony! Wyatt Earp 14 December 1957 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Man Who Outdrew Earp!
Mob Rule Wyatt Earp 16 April 1958 John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
Joe Maneely pencils and inks attributed
cover One Second Till Doom! Battle 58 June 1958 John Severin pencils signed
cover On the Trail of Sam Hawk, Manhunter!
The Return of Johnny Ringo! Kid Colt Outlaw 84 May 1959 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover The Dangerous Dude!
The Guns of Blackjack Hawkins! Wyatt Earp 23 June 1959 Bill Everett inks guess
John Severin pencils and inks unsigned
cover Trapped by El Lopo! Kid Colt Outlaw 86 September 1959 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover Shoot-out in the Silver Mine! Two-Gun Kid 50 October 1959 John Severin pencils and inks signed
cover My Gun for Hire! Two-Gun Kid 51 December 1959 John Severin pencils and inks signed

link: https://www.atlastales.com/search/n:124:b:1:e:1955:x:12:y:1960:z:c
John Ellis
John EllisSaturday, June 24th, 2017 at 5:27pm
Parody Kurtzman cover I did for an APA back in '79...
Philip Smith
Philip SmithMonday, June 19th, 2017 at 3:37am
TWO-FISTED MONTH—DAY 18! Two-Fisted Tales 35 is the last issue to show Harvey Kurtzman’s full editorial guidance (and the last to contain any stories written by him), and it is also the third and final published installment of the planned seven-issue Civil War series. Perhaps responding to reader feedback on the first two issues—which some claimed demonstrated too much of a Union bias—Kurtzman gave this issue more of a Southern focus.

The great Davis cover prominently features the Confederate Battle Flag (which had not, when this issue was released in July 1953, attained the same level of notoriety that it would in years following the 1954 Brown v. Topeka Board of Education verdict, when its use became more politicized). And the issue leads off with “Robert E. Lee!”, drawn by Severin.

While I do not think Kurtzman displays any kind of coordinated anti-Southern prejudice in the series issues that were published, there is a definite sense, I would say, that “We” is the North and “They” is the South in his viewpoint. So, for instance, the stories focused on Lincoln and Grant recount their earlier lives in flashbacks, while the subject of “Robert E. Lee!” is shown as practically an equestrian statue designated by the Fates to oversee the Battle of Fredericksburg. (Lee never speaks—being only indirectly quoted in a caption—nor does Stonewall Jackson in “Chancellorsville!”, which closes this issue.)

While this is not a fatal shortcoming, it does tend to oversimplify, for instance, the political situation at the time of the 1860 election, and still-complicated questions of Constitutional Law and the Founding Era (the constitutionality of secession is only addressed in the first issue of the series, through an excerpt from Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address). While Kurtzman mercifully avoids pandering “Lost Cause” sentimentalism of the sort that pervades Gone With The Wind, there is a sense in which the larger economic and cultural clash that the War represented is given limited treatment (possibly to avoid having to deal too directly with the issue of slavery, which is alluded to mainly in the framing device of the story on Lincoln). Kurtzman seems more comfortable with military technology than with politics, so some social conflicts are treated as manifest in technological developments, such as the advent of ironclad ships.

Naval warfare receives a strong, even disproportionate, emphasis in the series (for instance, the battles of Shiloh and Antietam are not directly addressed at all, but half of the stories in the second and third issues of the series focus on ship-based engagements). This makes for some very striking work, as in “New Orleans!”, the second story in this issue, which I show here in full from the original publication. The complex integration of artwork and color within the comics medium has seldom been more dramatically realized.

The third story in this issue, “Memphis!”, is the only Reed Crandall contribution to a Kurtzman book. Which is astounding, because Crandall clearly gives it his all and produces tremendous results (his opening panel appears to have been signed for him by Marie Severin).

The issue closes with “Chancellorsville!” by Davis, covering the fateful battle at the close of which Stonewall Jackson was accidentally wounded by his troops. That seems to occur earlier than one might have expected in the series—Jackson is not otherwise treated, except as a background figure in the story on Lee. As conceived for 28 stories over 7 books, the series was to climax with the Battle of Gettysburg, which presumably would have appeared in the next issue (along with the Siege of Vicksburg, I am guessing).

One final note: the text stories in the three Civil War issues have related content: the first is an excerpt from Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address (as mentioned above); the second is a lampoonish and rather badly written piece on ballooning by Jerry De Fuccio; and the third (also written by De Fuccio), in this issue, concerns Nathan Bedford Forrest. Possibly Forrest was added here to contribute to the issue’s Southern emphasis—though he would certainly have warranted a story on his own. The text piece weirdly alludes to Forrest’s victory at Fort Pillow as a military achievement without noting the infamous massacre it reportedly entailed, possibly to avoid rousing controversy.
Philip Smith
Philip SmithTuesday, June 20th, 2017 at 4:44am
TWO-FISTED MONTH—DAY 19! Two-Fisted Tales 36 marked the beginning of the final phase of the title, with the editorial supervision transferred to an uncredited John Severin, and all stories written or co-written by Severin collaborator Colin Dawkins (who had written stories on Native American themes illustrated by Severin and Elder for Prize Comics Western—a cover example is included here). Severin relinquished his spot drawing for MAD in order to take up this opportunity. This issue was released in October 1953, a month after the final issue of Frontline Combat.

Dawkins would write issues 36–39, which were mostly illustrated by Severin. These issues marked a dramatic shift in focus and style for the magazine, being devoted to a range of repeated subgenres and characters (including espionage stories involving millionaire Ruby Ed Coffey and his team; Western stories featuring gunfighter Black Jack Slaughter; and Native American tales). The book was also shifted to a quarterly publication schedule.

These themes were indicated on the redesigned covers, which Dawkins helped design using research from his main career in advertising. All of the Dawkins-issue covers have white backgrounds and dynamic figure groups, with the title in a uniform yellow and orange for the first three.

The cover of issue 36 is a great Severin and Elder job, though the signature at right margin was opaqued in the original art (likely because of concerns about its being partially cut off in binding). This original was lost for many years, and is one that Severin redrew for the E.C. Library reprint in 1980.

Now the Dawkins and Severin issues would do credit to any comics publisher of the era, but it must be admitted that they are probably the least E.C.-like in tone of any of the New Trend books. The artwork is relatively spare (even for Severin) and the coloring tends to flat pastels with none of the flamboyant intensity of the later Kurtzman war issues. The element of the grotesque or bizarre that is present in other E.C.s is absent here, and there are stylistic tendencies (such as much less framing text in many stories) that also contribute to the “non-E.C.” feel. While this might have been one of the better New Direction titles for E.C., as a continuation of Kurtzman’s war title it feels jarring.

Dawkins indicates that sales initially dipped, then increased as the book found a new audience, but exact figures are unknown. (The Dawkins issues are relatively plentiful on the secondhand market, perhaps moreso than the final two issues.) Whatever its performance, that approach was discontinued after four issues, when the book reverted to a bimonthly with a range of artists and writers.

Two-Fisted Tales 36 is a transition into the all-Severin phase, opening with a Davis-illustrated Western story and a Crandall-drawn story of Roman conquest that Dawkins had lifted from “Claudius the God” by Robert Graves. The last two stories, a Native American tale illustrated by Severin and the first Ruby Ed Coffey story, illustrated by Severin and Elder, give more of a sense of where the book was headed in 1954.
Jon Gothold
Jon GotholdThursday, June 22nd, 2017 at 2:38am
TWO-FISTED MONTH-DAY TWENTY-ONE!

I have a confession to make.

I really didn’t like the John Severin/Colin Dawkins issues of Two-Fisted Tales very much. After I bought and read one of them, I put off buying the other ones for YEARS. I begrudgingly finally got around to getting them, because I am a completist and had to have them to finish the run. But I found reading them to be more of a chore than a pleasure.

I feel really bad about this because I love John Severin’s work. I have bought all kinds of comics over the years simply because his artwork was in it, so I really had to ask myself what the heck the problem is here. And I think I have the answer.

In my opinion, EC perfected the anthology approach to comic books. They may not have been the first to offer up four different stories drawn by four different artists, with each story a succinct and complete story on it’s own. I’m sure they were not the first ones to have each story feature non-recurring characters either. But nobody ever did it better than they did, though God knows many companies have tried. So when I sit down to read an EC, that’s what I’m looking for, and deviating from that formula seems to be something that didn’t tickle my particular fancy.

There have been very few examples of EC giving one artist an entire book to draw. Psychoanalysis ran for four issues, with every story and cover drawn by Jack Kamen. That series also featured recurring characters, just like The New Two-Fisted Tales did.
And I wasn’t real crazy about that book either. I figured it was mostly due to the comparatively dull subject matter, but Kamen’s other solo effort for EC, Shock Illustrated #1, features wife-swapping, drug addiction and serial killing…and it still falls flat.

Would I feel the same way if one of my very favorite EC artists handled the entire book? Like Wood, Williamson, Crandall, or Frazetta? I kinda think I might. I know, crazy, right?

I look at an EC comic like a fine meal-a beautifully cooked steak, a baked potato with all the trimmings, a fresh tossed Caesar salad and a rich glass of Cabernet.

Would I prefer only four baked potatoes? Or four steaks? Or four glasses of wine and no food at all? No, it’s about balance, and getting just the right amount of each magnificently crafted element, that when combined, makes for an unforgettable experience.

So, this issue, #38, has four stories drawn by John Severin and written by Colin Dawkins, colored by Marie Severin, and with a cover drawn by John Severin. Just like the one before it did, and the one after it will. I always mixed up these Severin issues, and had a hard time remembering which of them I had and didn’t have as I was collecting them.

But the creative and courageous spirit that EC always had about pushing the envelope and not being afraid to try something new, even if it didn’t always work, humbles me. Now THAT aspect of these issues I truly, dearly love.

So, let’s see your 38’s, and by all means, if you love these issues more than I did, let’s hear about that too!
Greg Gurr
Greg GurrSaturday, June 24th, 2017 at 12:36pm
Need a little help from the hive mind !! Picked up these Picture Stories from the Bible books this week. I know EC,DC and all American published these. Are there ways of telling which company published these ?
Also, I know it's a stretch but they also have a MC written on the covers. Any chance they were initialed by M.C. Gaines ? File copies perhaps. Probably not but you never know till u ask.
Dave Dustin
Dave DustinSaturday, June 24th, 2017 at 11:11am
Just scored these awesome books at a small shop here in Toronto Canada thanks to Paul Wardle for sharing his nice find....

Best Of EC: Artist's Edition vol. 1 and 2... because after seeing these fantastic books for the first time ever I Had to have them! I had no idea they were this huge!!! Good Lord!! I still have no idea where to store them as they won't fit on any shelf... but WOW!!! What beautiful artwork... these will never leave my collection!!

Also scored Wolverton In Space with lots of great artwork, Comic Book Culture that looks like an awesome 206 pg history of comic books, and Little Annie Fanny with Kurtzman and Elder Playboy strips... Hoo-hah!!!